Poetry Unit Plan   

Putting Pizzazz in Poetry

 

Unit Overview

Unit Plan Title

Putting Pizzazz in Poetry

Curriculum-Framing Questions

 

Essential Question

How do literary elements contribute to meaning in poetry?

 

 

Unit Questions

1. How does the use of onomatopoeia affect poetry?

 

2. How does the use of simile affect poetry?

 

3. How does the use of alliteration affect poetry?

 

4. How does the use of personification affect poetry?

 

Unit Summary

The students will spend several weeks studying a variety of literary elements with a specific focus on onomatopoeia, simile, personification, and alliteration. They will read and discuss both professional and student examples of poetry utilizing these elements in textbooks, handouts, and online. They will conclude the study of each element by creating an original poem using that element. At the end of the unit, each student will work with a partner to create a multimedia presentation, publication, or web site that demonstrates the analysis of poetry based on the literary elements, an evaluation of the effect of the elements on poetry, and the synthesis of these elements into an original poem.

 

 

Student Objectives/Learning Outcomes

1.      The student will demonstrate understanding of the definition and use of four literary elements: onomatopoeia, simile, alliteration, and personification.

2.      The student will explain the effects of these literary elements in various poems.

3.      The student will write an original poem for each of the literary elements.

4.      The student will create a multimedia presentation, publication, or web site that demonstrates the analysis of poetry based on the literary elements, an evaluation of the effect of the elements on poetry, and the synthesis of these elements into an original poem.

Targeted State Frameworks/Content Standards/Benchmarks

 Language Arts:

READING

3.4 Define how tone or meaning is conveyed in poetry through figurative language.

3.7 Explain the effects of common literary devices.

WRITING

1.1 Choose the form of writing (poem) that best suits the intended purpose.

 

LISTENING & SPEAKING

1.6 Support opinions with detailed evidence and with visual or media displays that use appropriate technology.

 

1.8 Analyze the use of rhetorical devices for intent and effect.

 

 

Procedures

Introduction

1.      Show students “Putting Pizzazz in Poetry” PowerPoint presentation.

2.      Elements of Literature: (pp. 168-173) Read & discuss the poem “John Henry”. Explain and identify basic poetry terminology – refrain, stanza, verse, rhyme, rhythm.

3.      Elements of Literature: (pp. 178-179) Read & dsicuss “Poetry: Sound Effects” as an overview of Onomatopoeia and Alliteration.

4.      Elements of Literature: (pp. 183-184) Read & discuss “Poetry: Seeing Likenesses” as an overview of Simile and Personification.

Alliteration

1.      Review the definition of alliteration. Ask students to restate it and cite examples.

2.      Analyze examples & evaluate the effects of onomatopoeia in the following poems:

a.      “The Flea and the Fly” (alliteration chart)

b.      “Precious Stones” by Christina Georgina Rossetti, “The Eagle” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and “White Butterflies” by Algernon Charles Swinburne (alliteration sampler)

3.      Using alliteration activity page, guide students in completing alliterative phrases and sentences. Have students share their creations.

4.      Read, analyze, and evaluate more examples of alliteration in both student written and classic poems on the alliteration study link web site. Guide students through the alliteration practice.

5.      From the alliteration activity page, read the description and example of an alliterative name poem.

6.      Read exemplary poems based on this assignment done by previous students that are posted on the classroom web site.

7.      Following the steps of the writing process, instruct students to write an alliterative poem based on their first names. Final draft to be done in Word with clip art or original art illustration relevant to the content of the poem.

8.      Post 10-12 of the best poems on the classroom web site, replacing those from previous students.

2.      Provide practice and reinforcement of concepts learned thus far through online Weekly Briefing assignment #1 on classroom website. See accompanying Weekly Briefing document.

Onomatopoeia

3.      Review the definition of onomatopoeia. Ask students to restate it and cite examples.

4.      Analyze examples & evaluate the effects of onomatopoeia in the following poems:

a.      “Ankylosaurus” by Jack Prelutsky (Elements of Literature p. 180)

b.       “The Bells” by Edgar Allan Poe (onomatopoeia chart)

c.      “The Night Wind” by Eugene Field (onomatopoeia sampler)

5.      Read, analyze, and evaluate more examples of onomatopoeia in both student written and classic poems on the onomatopoeia study link web site. Guide students through the onomatopoeia practice.

6.      From the onomatopoeia activity page, read the scenario of an incident with a buzzing bumble bee that contains much onomatopoeia.

7.      Read exemplary poems based on this scenario done by previous students that are posted on the classroom web site.

8.      Following the steps of the writing process, instruct students to write an original poem about a real or imaginary experience with a bumble bee using onomatopoeia. Final draft to be done in Word with clip art or original art illustration relevant to the content of the poem.

9.      Post 10-12 of the best poems on the classroom web site, replacing those from previous students.

10.  Provide practice and reinforcement of concepts learned thus far through online Weekly Briefing assignment #2 on classroom website. See accompanying Weekly Briefing document.

Simile

1.      Review the definition of simile. Ask students to restate it and cite examples.

2.      Analyze examples & evaluate the effects of simile in the following poems:

a.      “Scene” by Charlotte Zolotow (Elements of Literature p. 675)

b.      “Summer” and “Hurricanes” (simile pattern page)

3.      Using simile activity page, guide students in completing commonly used similes.

4.      Read, analyze, and evaluate more examples of simile in both student written and classic poems on the simile study link web site. Guide students through the simile practice.

5.      Read exemplary poems using simile done by previous students that are posted on the classroom web site.

6.      Following the steps of the writing process, instruct students to write an original poem using simile. Final draft to be done in Word with clip art or original art illustration relevant to the content of the poem.

7.      Post 10-12 of the best poems on the classroom web site, replacing those from previous students.

8.      Provide practice and reinforcement of concepts learned thus far through online Weekly Briefing assignment # 3 on classroom website. See accompanying Weekly Briefing document.

Personification

1.      At the beginning of the week, give homework assignment instructing students to write an original poem using at least one literary element they have studied and have it ready for the Weekly Briefing at the end of the week.

2.      Review the definition of personification. Ask students to restate it and cite examples.

3.      Analyze examples & evaluate the effects of simile in the following poems:

a.      “The Toaster” by William Jay Smith, “Things to Do if You Are a Subway” by Bobbi Katz, and “Steam Shovel” by Charles Malam (Elements of Literature pp. 186-190)

b.      “The Musical Lion” by Oliver Herford (personification chart)

c.      “Under a Telephone Wire” & “Proud Words” by Carl Sandburg, “The Puzzled Centipede”, and “Alas, Alack!” by Walter de la Mare (personification sampler)

4.      Read, analyze, and evaluate more examples of personification in both student written and classic poems on the personification study link web site. Guide students through the personification practice.

5.      From the personification activity page, read the scenario of a skyscraper that uses personification. Read over list of 13 possible subjects for personification.

6.      Read exemplary poems based on these subjects using personification done by previous students that are posted on the classroom web site.

7.      Following the steps of the writing process, instruct students to write an original poem using simile. Final draft to be done in Word with clip art or original art illustration relevant to the content of the poem.

8.      Post 10-12 of the best poems on the classroom web site, replacing those from previous students.

9.      Provide practice and reinforcement of concepts learned thus far through online Weekly Briefing assignment #4 on classroom website. See accompanying Weekly Briefing document.

Conclusion – Benchmark Project

1.      Explain to students that they will work with a partner to create a multimedia presentation, publication, or web site that demonstrates the analysis of poetry based on the literary elements, an evaluation of the effect of the elements on poetry, and the synthesis of these elements into an original poem.

2.      Using “Putting Pizzazz in Poetry” WebQuest on classroom web site, explain the steps for this project.

3.      Show student sample multimedia presentation, publication, and web site.

4.      Go over the scoring rubric for this project.

5.      Assign or have students choose partners.

6.      Pass out storyboard worksheets – one to each team appropriate for chosen form of project.

7.      As teams complete storyboards, they may begin using the computers to create their projects.

8.      Monitor team progress daily and provide assistance where needed with technology, resources, and time management.

9.      At the end of two weeks, students should have their final project ready to present to the class.

 

Approximate Time Needed

Six weeks: one week for each literary element and two weeks to complete the culminating project.

Prerequisite Skills

1.      Students are able to navigate the classroom website with ease to access online assignments and unit related links.

2.      Students are able to create, save, and print documents in Microsoft Word or other word processing program.

3.      Students are able to use Microsoft Outlook Express (or other e-mail program) to submit online assignments and attach and send Word documents to be published.

4.      Students have a basic knowledge of Microsoft PowerPoint or other multimedia program.

5.      Students have a basic knowledge of Microsoft Publisher or other publishing program.

6.      Students are able to use graphics through clipart, the web, digital photography, or scanning.

 

Printed Materials

Study guides for onomatopoeia, simile, alliteration, and personification.

Storyboard brainstorm worksheets for multimedia, publication, and web site creation.

Supplies

Grade level Language Arts textbook: Elements of Literature

Charts for onomatopoeia, alliteration, and personification

Colored pencils

Internet Resources

Teacher’s Site:

Mrs. Perez’s Classroom

http://home.earthlink.net/~cnperez/index.html

 

for use as Study Links:

Onomatopoeia

http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/omomatopoea.html

Simile

http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/simile.html

Alliteration

http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/alliteration.html

Personification

http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/personification.html

 

for use in Online Assignments:

The Poet’s Bookshelf

http://www.kyrene.k12.az.us/schools/brisas/sunda/poets/poet.htm

Poetry for Kids by Kenn Nesbitt

http://www.nesbitt.com/poetry/

Scholastic’s “Writing with Writers” Poetry Workshop

http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/poetry/index.htm

Giggle Poetry

http://www.gigglepoetry.com/

 

Resources:

Poetry Resources

http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/places/poetry.html

Halloween Poetry

http://holiday-tales.com/hallpoems.html

Rainbow Magic Halloween Library

http://www.rainbow-magic.com/holidays/halloween/index.html

 

Others

Onomatopoeia, Personification, and Alliteration Charts. American Teaching Aids: Minneapolis, MN.

Orndoff, Eleanor. Poetry Patterns. Evan-Moor: Monterey, CA. 1990

Brain Teasers – Intermediate. Teacher Created Materials, Inc.

Accommodations for Differentiated Instruction

 

Resource Student

Pair Resource students up with other students when working on the benchmark project.  An alternative would be to have resource students work as a group on a benchmark project with their aide if applicable.

 

Gifted Student

§         Have them help you find and bookmark appropriate poetry and literary element  Web sites.

§         Allow them to create their benchmark porject without templates.  They can design their own.

§         Act as technology assistants throughout the benchmark project, as well as completing their own projects.

§         Create more in-depth brochures, add more pages to their web sites, or more slides to their PowerPoint presentations.

§         Pair up with your resource students.

ESL Students:  Students who speak and understand minimal English can be paired with a student who speaks both English and Spanish if possible.

Student Assessment

Students will be assessed traditionally for the written assignments and activities.  For the benchmark project, the teacher will use the rubric to assess students. 

Key Word Search

poetry, literary elements, poetic devices, alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, simile